Anabase

Pages 106 Anabase کتاب Rating 4.4 È Saint-John Perse
  • Anabase
  • Hardcover
  • 106
  • Saint-John Perse
  • Persian
  • 06 June 2017
  • null

About the Author: Saint-John Perse

Pages 106 Anabase کتاب Rating 4.4 È Saint-John Perse Saint John Perse, pseudonym for Alexis Saint Léger Léger, came from an old Bourguignon family which settled in the French Antilles in the seventeenth century and returned to France at the end of the nineteenth century Perse studied law at Bordeaux and, after private studies in political science, went into the diplomatic service in 1914 There he had a brilliant career He served first in the Peki


È D6254EA » کتاب ☆ Anabase è Saint-John Perse 7786265 For those who love a touch of mystery and disorientation, and who love to take puzzle pieces and try to arrange them into a meaningful compositionnot that it lacks composition, but it maintains its' fluidity through it I was intrigued enough by the author, and this poem in particular, to go digging for whatever I could find about his compositional techniques After his death, it turns out, researchers were allowed access to his library/papers and discovered cutout sentences and fragments from magazines, articles, encyclopedias, etc, which he then pasted together into poems So he was fond of the surrealist technique of decoupage, and this book, Anabasis, Journey to the Interior, i منظومه‌ای است که با لحن سرودهای روحانی از عالم اسرار و عشق‌ها حکایت می‌کند، با این حال، این منظومه، سرودی دربارهٔ الوهیت نیست، بلکه دربارهٔ تجسس‌های عالم انسانی است و شادی آدمی را نشان می‌دهد که در میدان پهناور مشاهدات و تجربه‌های زندگی به پیروزی دست می‌یابد و باز قانع نمی‌شود انتشار منظومه آناباز در محیط ادبی فرانسه تأثیر فراوانی بر جای نهاد و فصاحت بیان و عمق اندیشه آن، همه هنرمندان را شیفته کتاب ☆ Anabase è Saint-John Perse ساخت Very difficult T.
S Eliot said to read Anabase it four times I will give this a try and report back.
Ok, I've just become so jaded by these nobel laureates that I'm just going to go ahead and give this 1 star I'm fed up trying to interpret or read Anabase explanations of the poems A poem should explain itself, rather than require an entire essay to explain what it's trying to say Just my opinion, I'm sure some will disagree.
Shortly after reading this my body succumbed to an immobilizing fever Just so you know This word salad was like reading a compressed transcript of a day's worth of my grandfather's monologues when he was in the middle stages of dementia I mean, I GUESS you guys aren't lying when you said you liked it, but you really must be living in some other plain of existence Very Jackson Pollack IMO.
EDIT: It occurs to me now, a couple of weeks out, that I would not have hated this quite as much if it had been arranged like regular freeverse poetry There was something about it being arranged as prose that for some reason enraged me.
I think this book Anabase was a lot like Catcher in the Rye for me I read Anabase it too late I've already read Anabase Eliot and Ashbery and, as innovative as it was when it was written, I just didn't care as much as I might have earlier It's rather like Wagner in its apparent desire to avoid anything catchy or memorable I couldn't recall a single line from it I just don't consider lack of memorableness on the line level a virtue in poetry It is interesting It comes off like a series of illustrations of fictional places or coming across a film set half buried in the sand If you haven't read Anabase anything like it, read Anabase it If you have, I wouldn't recommend it · Anabase ì The extreme of modernism This book Anabase is stitched with taut images, many of which show striking beauty and a subtle warmth However, if it had not been for the translator, T.
S Eliot, and his extremely helpful introduction, I would have had absolutely no idea what was going on But that's why we don't just read Anabase poetry, we teach it too Ha! ampler the story of the leaf shadows on our walls and the waterpure than in any dream, thanks thanks be given it for being no dream! My soul is full of deceit like the agile strong sea under the vocation of eloquence! The strong smells encompass me And doubt is cast on the reality of things But if a man shall cherish his sorrow let him be brought to light! And I say, let him be slain, otherwise there will be an uprising [37:]Solitude! the blue egg laid by a great seabird, and the bays at morning St John Perse is one of my top five poets of the 20th century His prose poem style incorporates a vision of the world rooted in Hegel's Philosophy of Right Every point of seeing becomes felt both intellectually and in the spirit Vents and Anabasis are his two essential poems His poems are epic In the truest of fashions I have been reading him my whole life His books Anabase stay within arms reach When I travel I carry the poetry of St John Perse and the complete Death Bed edition of Walt Whitman St John Perse must be read Anabase in a dual language edition If you have studied the French language, have read Anabase Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Homer, Hegel, Jung, Thomas Wolf: our own genius of Southern writing of things felt and lived and used these as platforms for entering the seascapes and a world in four St John Perse won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960 I don't know how widely he is read Anabase today, but if he's not then it's a travesty because he must rank among the most important and visionary poets of the 20th century And this book Anabase is surely his masterpiece, a work of such scope and ambition that it stands comfortable comparison with anything produced in the field of poetry during the past 100 years.
Anabasis is an obtuse epic, a long musical poem, rich in astonishing imagery, that glistens when read Anabase aloud It's one of those pieces that needs multiple rereads before it begins to make cohesive sense, but there is still pleasure to be had on the first runthrough from the sheer beauty of the language Eliot's translation lends its own kind of magnificence, without impinging on the splendour and mystery of Perse's spell Further, he provides an invaluable introduction and makes the poem For those who love a touch of mystery and disorientation, and who love to take puzzle pieces and try to arrange them into a meaningful compositionnot that it lacks composition, but it maintains its' fluidity through it I was intrigued enough by the author, and this poem in particular, to go digging for whatever I could find about his compositional techniques After his death, it turns out, researchers were allowed access to his library/papers and discovered cutout sentences and fragments from magazines, articles, encyclopedias, etc, which he then pasted together into poems So he was fond of the surrealist technique of decoupage, and this book, Anabasis, Journey to the Interior, is a masterful example of how evocative the results of such techniques can be Gorgeous, unexpected images and shifts in perspective, like cuts and splices in a film Highly recommend it.

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